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.s. law affecting disabled kids. but the treaty would not change u.s. law. in fact, there's no precedent that we can find that any u.n. treaty has ever changed u.s. law. we'll dig deeper on that in a moment. after the vote, cnn asked senator john kerry about santorum's claims. here's what he said. >> i have great respect for both rick and his wife karen and their daughter and their family. he's a strong family man. but he either simply hasn't read the treaty or doesn't understand it, or he was just not factual in what he said because the united nations has absolutely zero -- zero, i mean zero ability to order or to tell or to -- i mean, they can suggest, but they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything under this treaty. nothing. >> it's not just democrats saying that. in a moment you'll hear from a republican who says the exact same thing. former u.s. attorney dick thornburgh. but the big question that we've been trying to figure out is why? why the flip-flopping and the no-voting based on, as far as we can tell, a boatload of misinformation. well, it turns out i
to federal and state laws. one case involves the federal defense of marriage act, which denies federal benefits to same sex couples legally married in their own state. the other is a challenge to california's prop 8, which took away the right of same sex marriage that had been previously approved by state courts. >>> florida governor charlie crist completed his political transformation. crist was elected governor as a republican in 2006, then later ran for the senate as an independent. he campaigned for president obama, and spoke at the democratic national convention. he's now officially a democrat and is widely expected to run for governor again in 2014. >>> south africa's beloved nelson mandela is getting tests in a hospital. the country's president says no cause for alarm there. he says the 94-year-old mandela is getting tests consistent with his age. the nobel laureate became his nation's first black president. >>> the fbi wants to talk to a man in custody in egypt. he's a well known islamic extremist. that's why egypt wanted him taken down. but american terrorist watchers think he
legalized it within the last decade. washington's marijuana law makes it the only state that allows recreational pot use. by the way, colorado is just a couple of months away from enacting the very same freedoms. while it seems legal, is it really? those two states voted to make it so but the federal government still says it isn't so. quite frankly, nobody really knows who trumps who here in the political debate. the governors of both of those states say that the feds haven't even started talking to them yet. but how to reconcile these two laws that are diametrically opposed. the feds may be tipping their hands when and making plans for a bit after crackdown on these brand-new state freedoms. what the feds do could ultimately reverse what those states did. more likely what the state voters did which means that the supreme court may end up the ultimate referee in all of this. joining me now is the former u.s. attorney general in the bush administration, alberto gonzalez. probably one of the better voices to ask about what's happening. thank you so much for being on the program. did y
constitutional challenges to same-sex marriage laws. if the court were to follow public opinion, the decision could come down in favor of gay and lesbian couples. recent polling shows 53% of americans think same-sex marriage should be legal. 46% say illegal. and on election day, voters in three states approved same-sex marriage. "outfront," mckay coppins, tim carney and maria cardona, cnn contributor and democratic strategist. this is kind of big news in all of this. tim, you saw the polls. now the supreme court will get involved in this. should this signal something to the republican party? should they say it's reached this level, we need to rethink our position on this? >> polls are one thing. there's also the fact most states don't have gay marriage yet and most of those that do, it was not put in by the will of the people. i'm a marylander. we did -- our state did vote for gay marriage. most of them had to do with judges ruling. if the supreme court does for gay marriage what it did for abortion and roe v. wade and said, no, this is not in the hands of the people. we're going to say there
. the governors made it clear he's ready to make it law. that would make michigan, which is considered the birth place of organized labor, the 24th right to work state. >>> for a second straight day, growing outrage in egypt as protesters attacked president mohamed morsi's house. and others demonstrate in tahrir square. a live report on the protests right after this. [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus presents the cold truth. i have a cold... i took dayquil, but i still have a runny nose. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't work on runny noses. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have an antihistamine. really? [ male announcer ] really. alka-seltzer plus cold and cough fights your worst cold symptoms, plus has a fast acting antihistamine to relieve your runny nose. [ sighs ] thank you! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus. ♪ oh what a relief it is! ♪ [ male announcer ] can't find theraflu? try alka-seltzer plus for fast, liquid, cold, and flu relief. [ male announcer ] are you on medicare? do you have the coverage you need?
it was in bad taste and ill-judged that any laws were broken by his two deejays making this prank call, so, again, a lot of sadness and regret being expressed. >> hard to imagine that it has taken the turn that it has. matthew chance, thank you very much. >>> the supreme court is stepping right into the middle of the same-sex marriage debate. the justices have decided to hear two important cases which will no doubt have major ramifications. cnn's crime and justice correspondent joe johns has a look for us. >> reporter: randi, after weeks of speculation, the court decided to take up two cases on the issue of same-sex marriage. the first one is about the defense of marriage act, windsor against the united states. edith windsor and her partner were married in toronto, canada in 2007. spire died in 2009 in new york at a time when new york recognized same-sex marriages that had been performed outside the side. when spire died windsor was required to pay $363,000 in federal estate taxes on her inheritance that she would not have had to pay if federal law had given their relationship the same sta
jihadist. 45 years old with a master's in sharia law. after the down fall of hasni mubarak he was released from jail and is believed to with be behind a terror group seeking to align with al qaeda. now achmed allegedly confessed to traveling to libya and having joined the resistance there. but an egyptian official said he denied any connection to the attack on the u.s. consulate or affiliation for al qaeda. at the time he was arrested he was armed with two machine guns. he's believed to be connected to a terror cell called the nasr city cell. when it was taken down there was a huge stockpile of weapons including rocket-propelled grenades, explosive belts and investigators have work to do now to figure out his suspected role in the u.s. consulate attack. >> the denials are interesting. thanks, susan. i know you will stay on top of that. next march the u.s. supreme court is expected to tackle laws governing same-sex marriage. it will hear two arguments, one involves the constitutionality of the defense of marriage act which denies federal benefits to same sex spouses. the case was brought by
/a.i.d.s., but it also brings up a tough issue. more than half the united states' states have laws that make it a crime for people with hiv to not disclose it when they have sex. now, some say that's only fair. others say making this a crime, that just scares people and keeps them from getting tested or seeking care. four years ago, nick rhodes, and hiv positive 24-year-old living in iowa, met a younger man. they hit it off and had sex. >> my viral load was undetectable. i wore a condom. i did everything i could to protect him and myself. >> what rhodes didn't do what tell his friend about having hiv. when the friend found out later, he sought treatment at a local hospital, and a hospital employee called the police. rhodes was arrested, charged with criminal transmission of hiv, and after pleading guilty on the advice of his lawyer, he was sentenced to 25 years in prison. >> i served over a year locked up, some of it in maximum security and some of it in solitary confinement. i still have to register as a sex offendser f offender for th life. >> rhodes' new lawyer is asking the iowa supreme court to ov
streets when the law took effect. i'll be interested to find out what the absentee rate is at seattle workplaces today, miguel. >> reporter: i think most people are going to work here. it's not quite as crazy as that. it's cold and rainy. puts a damper on things. there were a lot of parties across the entire state and a lot of those issues you raised will be taken care of in the near future. last night was a night for celebration for these folks. >> four, three, two, one. >> reporter: the moment recreational pot, anything less than an ounce no longer illegal in washington state. >> it's amazing. i'm not a criminal anymore. i can't go to jail for small amounts of marijuana. i'm free to be free. >> reporter: several dozen hardcore smokers showed up at the base of the space needle to light up at the stroke of midnight and while the new law does not allow smoking in public places, seattle police and police departments across the state are turning a blind eye tonight allowing celebrations to light up. >> this is what you assume stores will look like or something along these lines? >> yes.
are on the verge of passing a right to work law. experts say it would be massive symbolic blow to the labor movement. susan candiotti is on the line with us. they would be forced to pay union dues even though they will stild enjoy the benefits of contracts. if this becomes law, what would it mean for unions and what kind of political path they can carry after this? >> that is the question, isn't it? politically, it could be a major blow to unions. last month in michigan, voters rejected a referendum that would have made this unconstitutional. passage could also make unions in the private sector obsolete. if the law passes, union supporters are convinced pay and benefits could take a big hit. the later bureau of labor statistics for 2011 put the immedia median salary for full time union workers at about $940 a week. compared to about $730 a week for nonunion workers. the head of the united auto workers in michigan, not happy. >> data and the facts from all of the right to work states show that it's right to work for less. >> in michigan, 17.5% of the workforce is unionized. one of the highes
law, in their words, to interfere with domestic laws in the united states, whether federal law, state, or local laws. and one of the most recent major reasons why they rejected this treaty, these republicans by in large voted again ratifying this treaty was because of the powerful words that rick santorum, the former republican presidential candidate said. as you know, he has a severely disabled child, a little girl. he said, i don't want international lawyers, i don't want the united nations and new york and foreign countries telling me and our local officials what they can or cannot do as far as treatment for little bella, his daughter. and that was a powerful factor in convincing a lot of these republicans to reject this treaty. they didn't see that they needed the international community, in effect, to get involved in what was going on here in the united states. the counterargument, of course, is we want to bring, by ratifying this treaty, to bring the rest of the world up to the u.s. standards in hoping those with disabilities but that obviously didn't resonate, at least not enou
comments online? >> we're seeing another information where technology has outstripped the law. you know, in the past to get published in a newspaper, to get widespread distribution of your complaints against somebody, very hard. you have to get a newspaper to take you seriously. they have to have a big readership. now you just go online. i was reading one account that said yelp has as many as 83 million visitors to the sites. you can literally destroy a business by posting negative things about the business. it's tough on the businesses. they have very little recourse. the communications decency law that protects angie's list and yelp from being sued. they can say, hey, we're just a forum. if people want to post, they can post. the only thing a business can do is sue, saying you defamed me and i'm going to sue you for money damages. suits like this will scare people from posting on the internet and we'll have less free speech and less exchange of ideas and people kind of like the fact that you can go on the internet and check people out. so this is an evolving area of the law. i think y
sovereignty and freedoms. there is a provision in this law which we would be adopting if the senate ratifies this. which puts the state in the division of the child. ji cannot support the treaty to raise their children with the constant threat of state interference. >> the treaty could interfere for parents to decide what action is in the best interest of their children. >> that is not true. but it doesn't and i repeat does not require any changes to existing state and federal laws. dick thornburg testified saying that the treaty's provisions recognize the prevention as a non discrimination instrument similar to our own americans with disabilities act. that fact didn't stop rick santorum from twisting the facts along the way. >> this is a direct assault on us and to our family to hand over to the state to make medical determinations and see what is in the best interest of the child and not look at what the gift every child is. >> john kerry said this is one of the saddest days that i have seen in the 28 days i've been in the senate. today he addressed mr. santorum's claims. >> i have great r
to possess up to an ounce of marijuana. the new law took effect at midnight and people marked the occasion with a pot party at seattle space needle overnight. it's not a blanket license to smoke pot anywhere anytime. cnn's miguel marquez has been up all night, live in seattle for us. so it's not illegal to smoke marijuana but the whole distribution network of marijuana and the distribution and sale of marijuana is still illegal. there's a big asterisk here for recreational pot users. >> reporter: for now it is. in the next year or so that will be taken care of, as this law takes effect. but today was the first big step in what people here are calling a revolution. that pot, less than an ounce is now legal to possess and use. ♪ ♪ i messed up my entire life because i got high ♪ >> reporter: anything less than an ounce no longer illegal in washington state. >> it's amazing. i'm not a cell anymore. i can't go to jail for small amounts of marijuana, you know. i'm free to be free. >> reporter: several dozen hard core smokers showed up here to the base of the space needle, the symbol of the
gupta, a law and mba student at george washington university, died suddenly. mysteriously. he's no relationship to me, but when his family got word, they spent hours trading phone calls. they were in stunned disbelief. >> there was a message from his mom, and she had left three messages for me so i knew there was something wrong. >> i received a call from my mom. i didn't answer, but then i got a text message from her, which is very unusual. >> and i called her back. and i said, what happened? and she says, it's ben. he died. i just -- i didn't have any of the information. >> i finally said, how did this happen? and she said he went to sleep the night before and he just never woke up. >> he's always smiling, every picture he's smiling. >> for days, ben gupta's family was desperate for answers. what killed him? he was only 28 years old. he had recently been given a clean bill of health. how could he just not wake up? >> and then the thought went through my mind that maybe it was some sort of a brain aneurism or something must have happened. >> but his father was in for a shock
your ground" law should be outlawed. >>> an identity crisis at the heart of the u.s. financial crisis. a top conservative thinks so. >> honestly, i don't know what the republicans stand for anymore. >>> and from brothel owner to community leader, just elected to political office, the owner of the mustang ranch talks to me about his landslide victory. >>> let's talk, everyone, also remember, i'm on twitter, @donlemon, same thing on facebook as well. another shooting death in florida involving a black teenager and a shooter of a different race. this took place all because the admitted shooter says he thought the music was too loud in the car the 17-year-old was riding in. dunn felt threatened and shot eight rounds into the car. the victim's mother is in shock. >> you shot me over some music? and he was in the car. and there's no logical reason, there's nothing logical that you can say that would make me believe that you were threatened. >> 17-year-old jordan davis was laid to rest today in suburban atlanta. his father says this didn't have to happen. and the "stand your ground" law enco
passage of this law unconstitutional. if that right to work law passes, union supporters are convinced pay and benefit could take a major dive. the latest bureau of labor statistics for 2011 put the median salary for full-time union workers at about $940 week compared to about $730 a week for nonunion workers. the head of the united auto workers not happy. >> the data and all the facts show that right to work is the right to work for less. >> susan, supporters including republicans led by gop governor rick snyder maintain that this bill will wind up helping the economy and not hurting it, right. >> that's right allison. the governor insists that the right to work bill will save jobs and increase salaries by not forcing union dues on workers. here's michigan governor rick snyder. >> to give freedom of choice to our workplace and that legislators move promptly and efficiently in moving it through the legislature and when it arrives on my desk, i plan on signing it. >> susan, are we going to see more of the same this week? what kind of turnout are you expecting to see at michigan's capitol wh
and e-mails, but texts are much harder to track down. that could change if law enforcement agencies can persuade congress to act. raton has been looking forward to this story. >> wolf, law enforcement wants to be able to retrieve our text messag messages, not just the so-called meta data. they want our carriers to store it for at least three months. these days, your text is where if evidence is. >> reporter: michelle medoff says she started getting the harassing texts in early november. an anonymous person threatened to send news pictures of her. >> reporter: the threats came from different cell phone numbers. medoff, a model and college student, was terrified. >> i was very, very afraid. that week, i didn't go to a night class because i didn't feel safe to walk by myself. >> it's those kinds of texts that u.s. law enforcement authorities want more power to investigate. several groups, including chiefs of police, sheriff's associations, are pushing congress to pass a law saying your carrier has to record and store your text messages. it's not clear how long they want them stored. scott
is not going to obey the gun laws. they are going to find a gun or find another weapon. >> stretching and shooting to syria and chemical weapons seems like a bit of a stretch. the implications of that is that every american should have access to chemical weapons and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe and the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. >> abbey, here is what they say to me. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. britain has 35 as does germany and australia. to countries that have strict gun kcontrol have little gun murder. i think carole had it right. she said it is about personal responsibility. that is the most important part. it is a difficult one. people are going to have an oh w pinion about it. we have to make sure that they were -- wanted the american people to feel protected about the british at the time. i don't think people should be able to go online and buy guns. there should
? you can't just say oops. >> reporter: if you read the language closely in some laws, it talks about that personal responsibility, but ultimately for the person that's hiv positive, these laws are really targeting those people specifically and i think this whole notion of what they're obligated to do, what punishment they may incur is really what's at the heart of the issue. >> still a question mark. sanjay gupta, thank you so much. see more reporting from sanjay this weekend. saturday afternoon, 4:30. wolf blitzer is in "the situation room." >>> happening now. breaking news, united states supreme court just announced it will decide two highly controversial cases about gay marriage. >>> also, retailers gearing up for the holidays are having a big impact on the nation's unemployment rate. but if you look closer, there's a disturbing trend in the latest job numbers. >>> plus, president obama's top strategist as you've never seen him before. >>> and during this hour, a member of the cnn team is ready to up the ante and reach for his own shaving cream. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the si
exactly that. there's no nothing in the treaty that interferes with u.s. laws. that didn't stop senator santorum to send out this e-mail. you did it. you made it happen. if it weren't for you the united states senate wouldn't have defeated the united nations convention on the rights of persons with disables and said it would have given the u.n. oversight of the health care and education choices parents with special needs kids need to make. had it been the law of the land it would have trumped state laws and could have been used as precedent by state and federal judges. that is not true. so, why the fudging of facts and we asked senator santorum on the program. he, too, declined. we can only guess the motivations and frankly some of this is kind of so baffling we'd be taking wild guesses and we don't want to do that. the treaty supporters including senator kerry say that politics and a paranoia about the u.n. trumped the rights of the disabled in this vote. ted kennedy jr., the son of the late senator kennedy is a health care attorney and advocate for people with disabilities. when he wa
in the treaty that interferes with u.s., federal or state laws, nothing. that didn't stop mr. santorum to send out this e-mail to supporters after the vote saying you did it. you made it happen. if it weren't for you, the u.s. senate wouldn't have defeated the united nations convention on the rights of person with disability. he went on to say, quote, this treaty would have given the u.n. oversight of the health care and education choices parents with special needs kids make. had it passed, crpd would have been the law of the land under the u.s. constitution supremacy clause and trumped state laws and could have been used as precedent by state and federal judges. again, that's not true. why the fudging of facts? we asked senator santorum on the program tonight. he declined, and like the others that won't explain themselves, we can guess their motivations and frankly it's so baffling we're taking wide guesses and we don't want to do that. the treaty supporters say that politics and a paranoia about the u.n. trumped the rights of the disabled in this vote. ted kennedy jr. is a health care attorn
not affect u.s. law. >> no, it doesn't affect u.s. law but evidently they didn't feel like it was guarantees they were looking for, but in fact, when it passed the foreign relations committee on the 13-6 vote, a number of these concerns were actually incorporated. >> this was really a treaty about people with disabilities overseas. >> this is about bringing the rest of the world up to the u.s. standards. okay? and so it does impact americans who travel overseas. who go work overseas. somebody who -- somebody with a disable to stay in a hotel in a foreign country or work in a foreign country or hail a taxi in a foreign country and impacts 650 million people around the world. children with disabilities around the world who do not have access to a public school education. it affords them huge rights and for the united states to not be in the vanguard, we have been in the forefront of disability rights and disability rights has always been a bipartisan cause in -- from the rehab act of 1973 to special education where people like my dad worked with senator orrin hatch, so many other republicans i
if law enforcement agencies can persuade congress to act. there are new developments and brian todd is joining us now. what's going on here, brian? >> wolf, law enforcement now wants to be able to retrieve our text messages. not just the so-called meta data, the who and when, they want the context and carriers to store it for three months. as one prosecutor pointed out to us, these days your text is often where the evidence is. michelle says she started getting the harassing texts in early november. an anonymous person threatened to send nude pictures of her to her mother and then to a wide circulation. one text said i'm so close to sending them to everyone. you are so sexy, you'll be an online star in no time unless you answer me. the threats came from different cell phone numbers. a model and college student, she was terrified. >> i was very, very afraid. i mean, that week i didn't go to a night class because i didn't feel safe to walk by myself. >> reporter: it's tho kinds of texts that u.s. law enforcement authorities want more power to investigate. several law enforcement group
the writing of law. that's the concern that those people have. under mubarak it was a secular nation, and now it's not. >> so if you are one of egypt's neighbors and you look and see what's going on inside, are you worried? are you concerned here? does it look like an arab spring that would actually spill over to the region, or is this something that egypt has to hand on its own and it will sort out? >> the latter. it's going to be the latter wrrn other nations aren't worried. the west is probably looking at how egypt is going in terms of the constitution, and a bit worried about the new egypt they will be dealing with when it comes to international relations. my sense is here a lot of people have sort of written off the muslim brotherhood in other countries as well at veers times. invariably, they've been wrong. these guys are organized and they have strong support, and, unfortunately, the guys on the street said not so organized, not as much support, and there's the cairo factor. it's want the same outside of cairo. >> thanks. appreciate it. >> i want to bring in our barbara star. she's at
it law. if signed into law, in fact, that would cause quite a problem pour those folks. michigan would join 23 other states. michigan is considered the birthplace of organized labor. it's now on the verge of becoming the 24th right to work state. thanks, everyone. suzanne malveaux is up next with "newsroom international." have a great day. >> welcome to "newsroom international." i'm suzanne malveaux. here's what's going on right now. a shocker on the jobs front. 146,000 new jobs added. that is almost twice as many jobs created in november than expected. the unemployment rate falls even further below 8%. we now have the lowest unemployment rate in four years at 7.7%. we're following the markets to see if it has an impact as well. cnn has now learned that pentagon officials are reworking their plans for possible military action against syria. that is after now confirmed reports emerging from syria that forces loyal to president bashir al assad are preparing bombs with chemical weapons. syrian soldiers fighting with rebels for control over the outskirts of damascus. now, witnesses tell cn
director for the national,or for the reform of marijuana laws. oregon senator jeff merkley, heidi ewing, and rachel grady will be joining us. steve satich, ohio congressman, steve latourette, and ambassador nick burns are our guests this morning. it's thursday, december 6th, and "starting point" begins right now. >>> welcome, everybody. our starting point this morning, some major developments to tell you about in egypt, after angry protests against political moves by the president, mohamed morsi, have turned deadly. tanks, armored personnel vehicles, all stationed outside the presidential analysis cairo. not only are they guarding the palace, they're also keeping apart supporters and opponents of morsi. hundreds of his islamist supporters already taking to the streets in cairo this morning. opponents are gathering not very far away. last night the two sides clashed right outside the palace. the violence killed at least five people. hundreds of other people were injured. opponents are demanding that morsi dial back on those sweeping powers that he has granted himself. cnn's reza sayah is
. and the hospital has pointed out that they probably broke the law, at least that's the advice the hospital's received. this is a few other things the chief executive said. >> technically i think this was a breach of patient confidentiality, which i regret. having said that, the information which was inadvertently revealed is already in the public domain. i think this whole thing is pretty deplorable. our nurses are caring, professional people not to cope with journalistic trickery of this sort. >> max foster reporting for us. you get the point what's going on. pranksters in australia, potentially could be in some trouble despite their apology. we'll continue to watch the story. we, of course, wish the duchess of cambridge only the best. >>> meanwhile, important new research that could impact people that take aspirin to reduce the risk of hard attacks and strokes. a common coating used on aspirin, stand by we'll give you details. for pain, it's just for sleep. because sleep is a beautiful thing. ♪ zzzquil, the non-habit forming sleep-aid from the makers of nyquil. well, having a ton of lo
of the power of just one shell in a city like homs. we appreciate you to be on. >>> up next, while law makers have been battling over the fiscal cliff crisis, they managed to find time to vote on a treaty that would have protected disabled around the world. republicans blocked it with their vote. you might ask, why would they do that? you see, c-max helps you load your freight, with its foot-activated lift gate. but that's not all you'll see, cause c-max also beats prius v, with better mpg. say hi to the all-new 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. of washington about the future of medicare and social security. anncr: but you deserve straight talk about the options on the... table and what they mean for you and your family. ancr: aarp is cutting through all the political spin. because for our 37 million members, only one word counts. get the facts at let's keep medicare... and social security strong for generations to come. i have obligations. cute tobligations, but obligations.g. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, b
him? >> we know he's 45 years old, masters degree in sharia law. he's also believed to be the driving force behind a new terror group seeking to align itself with al qaeda. this is according to both the u.s. and an egyptian official. the egyptian official said he has denied any connection to the afacon the u.s. consulate or affiliation with al qaeda, but he's also believed to be connected to a heavily armed terror cell raided in october in egypt. five people were arrested at that time. >> right, and probably not the only suspect, right? is the fbi making more progress in this? >> well, it's hard to tell how this is going. we know they're looking at a lot of people. we also know that the fbi hoped to question, for example, a tunisia suspect. but after finally getting access to him, he refused to speak. now that's just one suspect. abu ahmed is another. we don't know the role the five others in the terrorist cell in egypt may have played in all of this. >> susan candiotti in new york, thank you for that. >>> we should get more information about the benghazi attack when secretary of stat
laid back new year's celebration ever? no. celebration of washington state's brand new pot law. yes, they're smoking joints. >>> i dare you, like double dare you. obama administration bites and says, yeah, we're prepared to go off the fiscal cliff. >>> roger goodell, the commissioner football fans love to hate. there's a softer, gentler side of goodell. seriously. the nfl commissioner you don't know. "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning. thank you so much for joining me. i'm carol costello. smoke 'em if you got 'em. recreational marijuana is officially legal in washington state. shall we say a rather mellow celebration at seattle's space needle? pot smokers lit up like it was new year's eve. new voter approved initiative went into effect midnight. this pot party technically, is illegal. wz's law bans smoking pot in public places. for now the seattle police department is turning a blind eye. this notice was sent to all officers last night. until further notice officers shall not take any enforcement action, other than to issue a verbal warning, for a violation of initiative 502. m
freedoms. listen. >> the problem is, there's a provision in this international law which we would be adopting if the senate ratifies this that puts the state, the state in the position of determining what is in the best interest of a disabled child. >> i simply cannot support a treaty that threatens the right of parents to raise their children with the constant looming threat of state interference. >> the treaty could be used to interfere with the ability of parents with disabled children to decide what action is in the best interest of their children. >> that all sounds very alarming. keeping them honest, it's just not true. the treaty does create a committee that can issue nonbinding recommendations on how nations can do better on disability rights. but it doesn't, i repeat, does not require any changes to existing state or federal laws. in july former republican attorney general dick thornburgh testified before the senate foreign relations committee saying, quote, protect u.s. sovereignty and recognize the convention as a nondiscrimination instrument similar to our own american
that are guesswork, but still, they're going to be conjectured. the t not like a court of law where you can go in and say this is the evidence. irrefutable proof. but on the other hand, there are certain things that the intelligence community can do. for example, they can assess how stockpiles are accumulating in the country. you mentioned that the russians had supplied some of these chemical agents and that is true. you can assess how each of these areas, you know what they've done, how they've done it and how often. also, you can have some intelligence that specifically outlines exactly how good the chemical weapons are. whether they will be used, what kind of training these people have and all this is weighed in. >> there are reports that the assad regime has loaded on to missiles, that they are ready to go. to your point, you need to get between assad and the person who's going to push the button. how do we know that? that they've loaded them on to missiles? >> there have been reports this week from the "new york times" about preparations and from nbc. now, do we know that's accurate? we d
of law where you say this is the evidence, this is irrefutable proof. on the other hand there are certain things that the intelligence community can do. for example, they can assess how stockpiles were accumulated in a particular country. you mentioned that the russians had supplied some chemical agents to the syrians and that's absolutely true. you can assess how each area supplies the syrians. you know what they've done, how they've done it and how often they do it. also you can have some intelligence sometimes from human sources that specifically outlines exactly, you know, how good the chemical weapons are, whether they'll be used, whether there's good training for it, what kind of training these people have and all of that is weighed in when they make their assessment. >> there are reports that the assad regime has loaded the chemical weapons onto missiles. you need to get between assad and the person that pushes the button on the missile. how do we know that? >> there are reports just this week from "the new york times" about preparations and from nbc. now, do we know that that's ac
to be an expert in islamic law if you want to have a prayer of discussing laws. there's lots of things like that. that's what's angering a lot of these liberals. >> steve, do you think the islamists will be able to push this through? >> egypt is a country of stunning ironies. they have pushed it through. the question is whether people will accept it. i think this was all kicked off by the fact that revolutionaries, supporters determined that they were not going to allow the muslim brotherhood to run the table unchallenged. it's unclear whether they will be able to overthrow morsi but they want to teach him a lesson by coming out into the streets and saying we will no longer be ruled by decree. you cannot take away the rights that we fought so hard for during those days of january and february of 2011. >> if you think of it, egypt is the great experiment. everybody now understands democracy is not just elections. it's liberal constitutionalism. it's these documents. it's civil society. egypt seems to be going in the direction of not liberal democracy but illiberal democracy. >> right. you're abs
still had that law in 1967. this gay right supporters have said this is the loving versus virginia of gay rights. we'll see. i don't know what the outcome will be. the fact that they took both these cases suggests they're really ready to engage with the issue. >> much more on the supreme court's decision throughout the morning. >>> and to politics now. he served his state as republican and left the party and turned independent and now charlie crist is officially a democrat. crist announced friday he signed papers switching party affilulations. he made the move to position himself for a run against republican rick scott in 2014. >>> is this the end of gangnum style mania? the most watched video in youtube history is now apologizing for anti-american lyrics that he rapped back in 2004. that performance resurfaced on cnn's ireport in october and then circulated online. calling for the deaths of american troops serving in iraq. in his apology he said his performance was emotionally charged. on the 21st psy is scheduled to perform at a charity concert in washington and president obalm s
're not raising them. that's current law. i think what the speaker has supported -- and you should look at the proposal he put out. the most interesting thing to me was every single one of our major leaguers signed it, paul ryan, who has a role because of his vice presidential nomination -- >> $800 billion worth of revenue. >> yes, a speaker is very strong, got us through a tough election, maintained our majority. i think this is a speaker at the peak of his power. the president will have to deal with him, and it's not just about this period of time, it's about the next four years. the president will be president for four years, john boehner is like i to be speaker for four years. so this is the first part of a relationship that will stretch for years. they need each other to succeed. >> does the speaker have enough votes inside his caucus to agree to some kind of tax rate hike in the upper echelons of society? the high wage earners? does he have those votes that he can put together with whatever nancy pelosi can stir up and pass it? >> i'm not sure there is support for the rate hikes.
of a little known federal law. now they're fighting to get her back, and may be on their way to the supreme court. i'll talk with them live. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. it is 10:00 on the east coast, 7:00 on the west. thanks so much for starting your day with us. it was supposed to be just for laughs. humor. the listeners with a lighthearted prank. two radio deejays called the london hospital where the duchess of cambridge was being treated and tricked a nurse to get details about her condition. two days later, that nurse, 46-year-old jacintha saldanha, took her own life. leaving behind a husband and two children. and now the deejays who played the prank are off the air. >> they have mutually decided that this show will not return until further notice out of respect of what can only be described as a tragedy. >> cnn's matthew chance has more now on the story generating outrage around the world. >> you know what? they were the worst accents ever. >> reporter: it was meant as a lighthearted aussie prank. even after this, the station issued an apology, the deejays who duped the
. kill guns, not kids. so we have to kill these gun laws that allow them -- the law enforcement has been trained and they're the only ones i feel that should have guns in public. >> this case has gotten a lot of attention, national attention, in some ways compared to the trayvon martin case. what are your thoughts about that? >> i don't think it's -- it just happened to be an african-american child and the nonafrican-american person that pulled the trigger. i think that's the only comparison. but i don't think the reason is the same. i think the reason for this gentleman was strictly anger and having the availability of a weapon. >> when people think about jordan davis, what should they remember? >> remember he's a 17-year-old child and you have a 17 or 15 or 16-year-old child, you know. and if some stranger tells you, gives you an order to turn your music down, most of the time they won't, most of the time they will give you a smart lip or whatever. but you as an adult, as parents, we don't expect people in the world to just gun down a child because of that. we don't expect a child to l
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